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UPCYCLING: IMPROVED RECYCLING

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Each year, more than 13 millions tons of residual materials are produced in the province of Quebec only. And, alone, the non residential sector of Canada creates over 15 millions tons of waste.

Our waste directly impacts our soil which directly impacts us. It contaminates what we eat: plants that grow in the soil, livestock that eat it… and therefore can create many health problems, food poisoning or congenital illnesses for instance.

Luckily, awareness toward the polluting effect of waste is increasing.

One way to reduce waste is to upcycle.

To what?

Upcycling! It’s like recycling to the highest level.

Recycling needs an extern source of energy (water, electricity, etc.) to transform a product.

Upcycling means to take something (an object, food, anything) that is no longer good nor functional and, instead of throwing it in the trash or in the recycle bin, you create something else with it, changing its utility.

Not only you transform the object but you actually transform it into something even better than its original form, upgrading its purpose.

Such a revalorisation of things prevents you from creating more waste but will also help you in a practical and/or decorative way.

Upcycling is therefore a way to lower your negative impact on the environment of course by reducing your waste, but it’s also a great manner to explore your creativity and to save money. #winwin

Here are a few examples of pretty and useful things you can create at home instead of getting rid of your stuff.

Outside planter, made from a dresser (found here):

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Wall covering, made from building material residues (found here)

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Pencils holder, made from food jars (found here):

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Cushions, made from sweaters (found here):

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Sandbox, made from an old boat (found here)

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Planter, made from an old light bulb (found here):

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It’s on you now! Show off your skills, create something but, most importantly, have fun and reduce your environmental footprint.🌿🌱

By Cloé Lachapelle

references:

https://www.consoglobe.com/upcycling-rien-ne-se-perd-tout-se-transforme-cg
http://www.ledevoir.com/opinion/chroniques/476462/le-surcyclage-un-phenomene-irreversible
https://www.optireno.com/tendance-deco/quest-ce-que-lupcycling-ou-le-surcyclage/
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/tables-tableaux/sum-som/l02/cst01/envir25a-fra.htm
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/tables-tableaux/sum-som/l02/cst01/envir32a-fra.htm
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/tables-tableaux/sum-som/l02/cst01/envi42a-fra.htm
https://www.canada.ca/fr/environnement-changement-climatique/services/indicateurs-environnementaux/emissions-gaz-effet-serre/province-territoire.html
http://poubelleprovince.radio-canada.ca/Etat-des-lieux/Quebechttp://poubelleprovince.radio-canada.ca/Quizz
https://www.ontario.ca/page/waste-management
https://www.conserve-energy-future.com/causes-and-effects-of-soil-pollution.php

*** cover photo : planter, made from a plastic bottle (https://waterstories.nestle-waters.com/environment/ways-to-upcycle-plastic-water-bottles/)

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